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Print 49 comment(s) - last by GotThumbs.. on May 22 at 12:59 PM

*115-miles maximum stated range, YMMV of course

The Germans are coming! We’ve already seen premium German automakers BMW and Mercedes-Benz bring their all-electric vehicles to the forefront with the i3 and B-Class Electric Drive, respectively. Now mainstream German automaker Volkswagen is looking to join the fun with its e-Golf.
 
The e-Golf is based on the seventh generation (MK7) Golf, which uses Volkswagen’s new modular MQB platform.

 
Compared to its German rivals, the e-Golf is down quite a bit on power. Whereas both the i3 and B-Class Electric Drive feature electric motors with at least 170hp, the e-Golf makes due with 115hp and 199 lb-ft of torque. Add in a curb weight of 3,090 lbs (compared to 2,634-lb for the i3) and you’re looking at barely adequate performance. Volkswagen says that the e-Golf will hit 60 mph in a leisurely 10 seconds and reach a top speed of 87 mph.
 
701 pounds of the e-Golf’s weight can be attributed to the lithium-ion battery pack, which is comprised of 264 individual cells. The battery pack has a total capacity of 24.2 kWh and can be charged in four hours using a 240-watt wall box, or in 20 hours using a standard household outlet.

 
Volkswagen says that the e-Golf can travel a maximum of 115 miles on a single charge. This is most likely a “when pigs fly” figure and would only be achievable in absolutely perfect conditions. The average “real world” range, however, is a more realistic 70 to 90 miles according to Volkswagen. The official EPA numbers will likely meet somewhere in the middle of that range, as the BMW i3 is EPA rated at 81 miles with its 22 kWh battery pack.
 
Volkswagen has not provided pricing information on its e-Golf yet, but we hope that the vehicle is priced more in line with the Nissan Leaf ($29,830) and Ford Focus Electric ($35,170) than the BMW i3 ($41,350) and Mercedes-Benz B-Class Electric Drive ($41,450).
 
The e-Golf will go on sale in the U.S. during the fourth quarter in “select states.”

Source: Volkswagen



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VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/14/2014 8:56:44 AM , Rating: 4
Underpowered, and no more range than EVs from years ago. Pretty half-assed attempt at a 2015 EV.

The only automakers using powerful electric motors are Tesla and BYD. I guess I shouldn't be surprised given that the only major part of a car the big automakers make themselves aside from the body is the ICE. Gotta protect your primary IP's market.

It's similar to how Intel half-assed the Atom for so many years until ARM & Qualcomm forced them to step their game up with Bay Trail. Gotta keep people buying the Core line of CPUs as long as possible.




RE: VW still playing catchup
By piroroadkill on 5/14/2014 9:17:26 AM , Rating: 2
Agreed. This is half-assed.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Reclaimer77 on 5/14/2014 10:07:23 AM , Rating: 1
There's no market for EV's. But since you continue to convince yourself EV's are ready for everyone, you still fail at realizing why automakers make "half assed" EV's.

Because they're being forced to. They don't want to make them, they know nobody wants to BUY them in any large number.

Yes, Tesla makes a great EV. It's also expensive as hell to manufacture and even more expensive to buy.

This is what you get for supporting Government forcing technology down the throats of businesses and people when the demand isn't there, and it's not cost effective to do so.

quote:
It's similar to how Intel half-assed the Atom for so many years until ARM & Qualcomm forced them to step their game up with Bay Trail.


Uhhh exactly. Did the Government force Intel to "step their game up"? Did ARM and Qualcom get subsidies to compete with against Intel? No!

I'm amazed that on one hand you seem to understand Capitalism and free market forces, then on the other not get how those apply to EV's as well.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Reclaimer77 on 5/14/14, Rating: 0
RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/14/2014 10:33:55 AM , Rating: 5
The Volt has a gasoline engine, genius.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By wordsworm on 5/14/2014 11:01:11 AM , Rating: 5
I think you made his day. No one calls him a genius.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Reclaimer77 on 5/14/14, Rating: -1
RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/14/2014 11:21:09 AM , Rating: 2
End of story? LOL. Nobody cares about your worthless incorrect assumptions.

The purpose of a PHEV is to offload regular, daily driving patterns to electricity, and do the rest on gasoline. That has always been the purpose, and always will be, regardless of what you think. 35 miles/day * 300 days per year = 10.5k miles per year on electricity. That's true whether you drive 1k additional miles on gas or 10k.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Reclaimer77 on 5/14/14, Rating: -1
RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/14/2014 11:59:03 AM , Rating: 3
Learn to read what? The opinions of people that you supposedly argued with years ago and said the Volt's engine will never be used? Where am I to read that? Show me, and then (and only then) tell me why I should care what these select few think when they aren't even part of this discussion.

If there's one thing I have to congratulate you on, it's being the king of topic derailment.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Reclaimer77 on 5/14/14, Rating: 0
RE: VW still playing catchup
By Spuke on 5/14/2014 1:20:43 PM , Rating: 2
Mint, you should remember those discussions, you WERE in most of them.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Reclaimer77 on 5/14/14, Rating: -1
RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/14/2014 1:32:47 PM , Rating: 2
Put up or STFU.

I'm still waiting for proof that I (or anyone else here) said that the Volt's engine will never be used, or that 40 miles range is enough for a pure EV.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Reclaimer77 on 5/14/14, Rating: 0
RE: VW still playing catchup
By flyingpants1 on 5/14/2014 2:09:19 PM , Rating: 2
As you well know, Volt buyers often don't use more than one tank of gas per year.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Reclaimer77 on 5/14/2014 6:00:56 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
As you well know, Volt buyers often don't use more than one tank of gas per year.


I know that's what they come here and claim, yes.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/14/2014 2:36:38 PM , Rating: 2
Do you even know what a straw man is? This is YOUR claim, not mine, and I'm merely asking for simple proof of something YOU claim was said "over and over again".

quote:
Nor are we readily provided the complete toolset to even efficiently search for such a thing.
Waaah! Waaah! Please, it took me 1 minute to use Google with site:dailytech.com to prove you wrong below, where you claimed I said pure EVs are for everyone. If you're too incompetent to use Google, then STFU and stop telling lies about what I or others said.

Pretty rich that you called me chicken and now you couldn't be more chicken if you tried. Any time someone confronts you to substantiate your BS, you run away or change the topic like a toddler.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/14/2014 11:10:24 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
There's no market for EV's. But since you continue to convince yourself EV's are ready for everyone
I never said they're for everyone, especially pure EVs.

But go look at every new technology: You ALWAYS aim for the high-end market first, then go for cost reduction to address the bigger market. Tesla success is based entirely on grabbing a big share of the $100k car market.

So why is nobody else following this blindingly obvious strategy? What's your explanation?
quote:
Uhhh exactly. Did the Government force Intel to "step their game up"? Did ARM and Qualcom get subsidies to compete with against Intel? No!
There's very few gov't forcing sales of EVs. Just the CARB states, and it amounts to a small percent. And guess what: Fuel cell vehicles are worth nine EV credits.

Subsidies are a red herring: EVERYONE can get their hands on them. It's an open competition. In what way are they an excuse for half-assed efforts?


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Reclaimer77 on 5/14/2014 11:26:14 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
So why is nobody else following this blindingly obvious strategy?


Huh?

How many $100k cars rolling around do you see on a daily basis?

Blindingly obvious strategy...lol okay. Says you.

quote:
There's very few gov't forcing sales of EVs. Just the CARB states, and it amounts to a small percent. And guess what: Fuel cell vehicles are worth nine EV credits.


Uhh CAFE?

It's IMPOSSIBLE to meet the new fleet requirements using just ICE vehicles, certainly ICE vehicles people are actually interested in buying.

To say EV's have nothing to do with Government influence is just walking with blinders on.

quote:
Subsidies are a red herring: EVERYONE can get their hands on them. It's an open competition. In what way are they an excuse for half-assed efforts?


Wow you just DO NO get this at all do you?

Saying everyone can get EV subsidies so that means everyone should be making EV's is the most simplistic, idealistic, nonsensical mentality one could possess.

quote:
I never said they're for everyone, especially pure EVs.


Oh no, you don't do that at all. You just browbeat anyone who says otherwise...


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/14/2014 1:27:43 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
How many $100k cars rolling around do you see on a daily basis?
Quite a few. It's got decent volumes with high margins, which is why VW group, BMW, Daimler, Toyota, and others all have a presence there with multiple vehicles. Am I to believe all these companies are idiots for investing in this segment? $100k was just an example, too, as these manufacturers didn't make EVs in the $60-90k segments either.

Rarely are engine technologies not introduced on performance cars before they trickle down. This is how technology always works if you're actually trying, as opposed to just fulfilling a PR need.
quote:
Saying everyone can get EV subsidies so that means everyone should be making EV's
Where did I say everyone should be making EVs? Huh? All I said is that it's an equal opportunity, nullifying the dumb analogy you made when saying, "Did ARM and Qualcom get subsidies to compete with against Intel?"

quote:
It's IMPOSSIBLE to meet the new fleet requirements using just ICE vehicles
WRONG:
http://green.autoblog.com/2014/01/17/mpg-cafe-stan...
54.5 CAFE is ~40 MPG real world, because for anything but a compact the actual requirement is lower. Automakers are ahead of schedule in meeting CAFE.
quote:
quote:
I never said they're for everyone, especially pure EVs.
Oh no, you don't do that at all. You just browbeat anyone who says otherwise...
All talk and zero proof. I suppose you think I browbeat myself? I've stated again and again that my guess is 10% market share for pure EVs:
http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=34814...
http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=31978...


RE: VW still playing catchup
By snhoj on 5/14/2014 7:12:15 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
But go look at every new technology: You ALWAYS aim for the high-end market first, then go for cost reduction to address the bigger market. Tesla success is based entirely on grabbing a big share of the $100k car market.

So why is nobody else following this blindingly obvious strategy? What's your explanation?


I think the VW group is sort of following that strategy though maybe not with this particular vehicle. Don't forget Porsche, Audi, Lamborghini, and Bentley are all part of the group. I personally think 10 seconds is acceptable. Range is OK for a shopping basket, errand runner, or maybe even a daily commuter. Price is unknown at this point. It’s not going to set your hair on fire but then it’s a Golf it’s not meant to.

I think Tesla licensed a lot of its initial technology for the roadster off AC propulsion and has since developed and patented its own unique take on the tech. AC propulsion has found and exploited an economic and power density sweet spot of building a large battery out of thousands of cheap commodity cells which already have the economies of scale of being produced in the tens of millions by a bunch of different manufacturers around the world in a competitive market.

Tesla is producing from the top down because they have trended the falling cost of those cells and the increasing Ah capacity and are relying on that continuing trend to meet cost and weight targets for their future models. The model S for instance has higher Ah cells that the roadster. At least I think that was their strategy in the beginning.
They are now buying so many cells that they can dictate minor changes without disrupting the economies.

You can bet that if Tesla’s battery partner had to bid for that position Tesla will be getting a very sharp price on their cells based on expected volumes. They may even be making money on other more minor contracts and just making volume on what they supply to Tesla, who knows? That happens in business sometimes where a factory will supply into a market where they just break even or even make a small loss in order to increase their production volume, which increases the utilization of plant and improves their economies of scale. They then make their money supplying into a parallel market where some factor tilts the economies in their favor such as shipping costs. It's a big bet to make and Tesla as an established player with plenty of IP to defend its position is a lot safer than any new comer. The point I'm making is that the big drops in costs for the cells at least are already in for Tesla and from now on its just tiny incremental improvements over a great deal of time.

Any way you can see from this that there are many barriers to entry and it would be extremely difficult for anyone to follow in Tesla’s footsteps.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/16/2014 10:58:34 AM , Rating: 2
Yup, I know about VW's pricier brands, which is why it's more shocking that they didn't see the opportunity that Musk did. They definitely have the purchasing power to not only follow in Tesla's footsteps, but they could have led.

It seems like CEO of VW recognized their gaffe, because the head of its Quattro unit was demoted for not getting a halo EV (R8 eTron) to market and giving away the segment to Tesla.

Anyway, regarding the eGolf, there are some hints to pricing, as it's only €50 less than the BMW i3. Consumers expect better than 10s 0-60 times in a $40k car. If it costs $30k before tax credit, then I'll partially retract my criticism, but it won't.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By chrnochime on 5/16/2014 3:45:52 PM , Rating: 2
Give away the segment? Ah yes comparing a 2 seater that's highly impractical and targeted at a very small part of the overall market to the Model S which plays in the crowded 70-100k luxury sedan market. Don't tell me it's practical compared to the BMW 6 and/or S class coupe. Post the same comment on Jalop or AB and you'd be laughed out. What a joke.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/16/2014 5:42:25 PM , Rating: 2
My apologies for skipping a few steps in my logic. The R8 eTron would've simply been the first step, similar to the Tesla Roadster. The eTron was first unveiled in 2009, and they did demo runs at LeMans in 2010.

As it is, they're planning to release a Q8 eTron in a few years based on what they learn from the R8 eTron. The whole process could have been advanced a few years.

They're seemingly doing the right things to catch up eventually, but the eGolf still has a pathetic motor for a 2015 $40k car.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By michael67 on 5/14/2014 11:59:08 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
This is what you get for supporting Government forcing technology down the throats of businesses and people when the demand isn't there, and it's not cost effective to do so.

Actually its just a numbers game, if your cheaper off whit a EV or Plug-In its a option for you, if not stick with petrol or diesel.

EVs are mostly a bad pick to use as your only car, but they are great as a second car to use to commute between work and home.

I have now a Model S, as they are real cheap compared to patrol cars here in Norway, specially if you really look at the TCO, if they sued your need.

But before that i drove a Think City, 43 miles a day to and from work, and with all the other driving i drove about 25.000km/y, and would be using about $5000/y, instead of just $700/y on the electric bill.

And my wife just got a Smart Fortwo coupe EV for $33.000 ware a comparable petrol model here $24.000 cost, and she will make the difference back in about 3~4 years.

Rouge car prices: finn.no/finn/car/used/result?keyword=smart%20fortwo %20coupe&sort=3
1$ = 5.9 Norwegian Kroner

Tho i agree EVs are not for everyone, but i think they could fir 20~30% of the drivers for there daily needs.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Belegost on 5/14/2014 1:46:07 PM , Rating: 2
The range is fine - for commuting purposes a realistic 80-90 miles is good.

The performance is lacking - 115 HP and 200ft-lb? The Chevy Spark EV does 140HP and 400ft-lb with a similar curb weight and range (Motortrend claimed they got pretty close to the rated range of 82 miles)

Not sure why Nissan and now VW keep with anemic engines.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/14/2014 2:08:03 PM , Rating: 2
I'll give Nissan a pass since they were first. But for an EV introduced in 2015, 116hp is a joke.

BYD makes a $30k PHEV with two 150hp electric motors. Their future target is for all EVs to do 0-100km/h in under 5s, because like Tesla (and anyone with a brain) they clearly recognize that high performance is where electric motors show the most advantage over ICE.

Now I'm to believe that VW can't even match half of what the Chinese can do?


RE: VW still playing catchup
By foxalopex on 5/14/2014 4:54:18 PM , Rating: 2
I would be careful comparing a Chinese car to a North American or European car. There's a lot of regular ICE Chinese cars which are much cheaper than the equivalent car in North America but get into a collision and I'll bet you won't want the Chinese car anymore because you'll be dead.

A bigger electric motor means more strain on the batteries and you just can't assume that your Lithium batteries can take it. It can lead to fires and other issues. The Volt for example is a hair faster when running both on battery and gas engine simultaneously because the battery can't safely supply the huge amount of current required. It is also why the original Telsa S with the small battery was slower than the Telsa S with the largest battery. The pack couldn't supply enough power. If you overdrive a Lithium battery even if it doesn't catch fire, you will kill it's overall lifespan.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Reclaimer77 on 5/14/2014 6:07:10 PM , Rating: 1
Why are you concerned with the horsepower of an EV? I mean..it's an EV.

If you honestly think Model S type performance is important to the average EV buyer...I don't know.

If you want high horsepower, well you want a car with some balls. The direct opposite of what people associate an "EV" with.

quote:
Now I'm to believe that VW can't even match half of what the Chinese can do?


LOL are we talking about the same VW? Of course they can't match the Chinese!


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/15/2014 6:10:42 AM , Rating: 2
I'm not asking for Model S performance. I'm asking for BMW i3 performance. This is slower than a Prius, and not even close to a Golf TDI.

And do you know why VW gave the Golf TDI enough power to be substantially faster than a Prius? Because doing so improves sales! Why is this so hard for you to understand?
quote:
LOL are we talking about the same VW? Of course they can't match the Chinese!

VW owns Porsche, Audi, Lamborghini, and Bugatti, among others. I only asked for them to match HALF of what the Chinese can do. Is that too much to ask for the world third largest automaker?


RE: VW still playing catchup
By snhoj on 5/14/2014 7:29:56 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The performance is lacking - 115 HP and 200ft-lb? The Chevy Spark EV does 140HP and 400ft-lb with a similar curb weight and range

Motor torque doesn't mean much if you don't know the gearing.


Needs to be marketed as "An additional vehicle"
By GotThumbs on 5/14/2014 11:34:02 AM , Rating: 2
I think VW needs to market this specifically as an "In addtion to" your other vehicle.

If the price can be kept very, very low, then VW could make a go of this and get buyers to use this as a daily work commute vehicle. I don't think this car could really ever be considered as a stand-alone car for someone, unless they rarely drive distances and then would simply rent a car for longer road trips.

Pricing of this vehicle is critical if it is expected to sell IMO. At least it looks better than the nissan leaf.

Maybe they should have used the smaller Rabbit shell, which should be lighter and more suited as a daily commuter vehicle.

Time will tell, but I'm not willing to spend over 10 grand for something in this group.




By Rukkian on 5/14/2014 2:01:42 PM , Rating: 2
The issue with even smaller cars, is a big portion of the weight of the vehicle is due to the battery pack. A smaller vehicle means either a smaller battery (lower capacity) or a higher % of the car weight for the battery itself. It would also mean that more of the total volume of the car would be taken by batteries.

I think a bigger vehicle makes sense for this type of vehicle (look at the model s and upcoming Model X). That way the proportion of battery to car weight is better.

As for the 10K number, I don't see that happening probably ever. While there are some cars you can get for 10k, that will probably not be much longer due to safety equipment regulations, and once you add in a battery pack (currently around 5-7k), there is just no way. I think we could eventually see 18-20k ev's, but that is still several years away imo.


RE: Needs to be marketed as "An additional vehicle"
By Spuke on 5/14/2014 4:04:16 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
If the price can be kept very, very low,
I guess you're not familiar with VW.


By GotThumbs on 5/22/2014 12:30:48 PM , Rating: 2
I've owned 3 VW Golfs, so you guessed wrong.


By foxalopex on 5/14/2014 5:11:06 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Time will tell, but I'm not willing to spend over 10 grand for something in this group.


Not willing to spend over 10 grand?? It's pretty hard to find a NEW decent normal gas powered car for under 10 grand (short of used), I don't even think a new 2014 Corolla is that cheap. And this uses all brand new, fairly expensive technology so I don't see how you would expect them to sell one of these at 10 grand.


By GotThumbs on 5/22/2014 12:59:16 PM , Rating: 2
http://www.eliomotors.com/

Here's your answer to a sub 10,000 vehicle that IS specifically designed as a commuter vehicle for those single drivers in SUV's


By Reclaimer77 on 5/14/2014 6:13:51 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I think VW needs to market this specifically as an "In addtion to" your other vehicle.


That's a losing strategy. You're basically saying they should target the least number of people as possible.

quote:
Time will tell, but I'm not willing to spend over 10 grand for something in this group.


The price of all EV's are ridiculous for what you get. Especially little shi*box ones like this, which to be clear, makes up the majority of all EV's.


Test drive an EV someday, you'll see
By foxalopex on 5/14/2014 5:27:05 PM , Rating: 2
I am already in my 2nd year of ownership with a Chevy Volt. I needed a gas engine because I do take my car on some long distance trips and our winters up in Canada are brutal. I suspect most of you commenting on EV's have never actually driven one in your life before. They are really nice!

There's no fumes, smoke or anything and it's very quiet. No roar of the engine, just wind and road sounds. It's a bit odd at first but nice when you can talk to your passenger easier, music comes through better.

Depending on how cheap power is in your area and how much battery range you have, I find you tend to start using an EV more than you think. Because electricity is usually a lot cheaper than gas, there's a tendency to abuse your car more for those short snack food runs or picking up friends.

There's no transmission so power output is smooth and linear with no jumps or pauses. When you hit the gas it's instantaneous.

Another fun trick to do with an EV is to completely floor the gas pedal. Most folks won't do this in a regular car because most cars get loud, you look like an idiot, it wastes a lot of fuel and you could potentially break something. In an EV, it's quiet so no one knows until you zoom away which can be fun. It's a bit like riding a slingshot at an amusement ride.




RE: Test drive an EV someday, you'll see
By Spuke on 5/15/2014 1:12:58 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
There's no fumes, smoke or anything and it's very quiet. No roar of the engine
My car doesn't smoke or have fumes either, you must've had problems with your previous cars. Also, I like my cars to make noise, at least noises from the engine. I put an aftermarket exhaust on mine because it was too quiet (turbocharger plus huge muffler equals too quiet for me). One thing I'll absolutely hate about EV's (I know I'm in the minority here). Fortunately, I don't have to buy one.


By snhoj on 5/15/2014 6:08:11 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
My car doesn't smoke or have fumes

But it does have an exhaust pipe. Park it idling in a poorly ventilated space and things will get noxious and smelly quite quickly. I'd call that fumes. Drive it in rush hour on a still morning surrounded by thousands of other idling cars, phew.
quote:
I like my cars to make noise, at least noises from the engine

Quiet cars have their own problems at least for the engineers that design them. Eliminate all engine noise and now you can hear other parts of the car working such as the suspension and the brakes. Wind noise and road noise becomes more prevalent. Everything else must also become quieter.

A reciprocating engine cannot reasonably achieve perfect balance and so relies on big soggy engine mounts to isolate the high amplitude vibrations from the shell of the car. Electric motors can be easily balanced to a high standard. It could be a case of not knowing how much these things intrude on your experience until they are gone.
quote:
One thing I'll absolutely hate about EV's (I know I'm in the minority here).

The quiet car has a novelty factor working for it at the moment. I can imagine someone going out to their EV in the morning and loading their car sounds iPhone app and saying to themselves I think I feel like driving a Ferrari today and driving off to the synthesized sounds of a Ferrari GTO’s marvelous mechanical noises all perfectly synced up to their cars controls.
quote:
Fortunately, I don't have to buy one.

To each his own.


240-watt wall box
By puplan on 5/15/2014 8:02:07 AM , Rating: 2
You surely meant 240V wall box, right?




RE: 240-watt wall box
By FaaR on 5/15/2014 8:51:46 AM , Rating: 3
It's Dailytech... What do you expect? :P


"Makes due" is do-do...
By Basilisk on 5/15/2014 2:24:58 PM , Rating: 2
'Spose it's pointless to mention that "makes do" is the correct English, not "makes due" (outside of a collection agency's use).

That muttered, I'd love to see these all-electric drive-trains assisted by a low-weight, high efficiency generator -- something that would double the range, better if there were meals, visits or other mid-trip stops. Besides the extended range, the generator would give the owner a Plan-B if they found themselves at the road-side with a discharged battery pack: they could do a partial recharge while parked, then creep towards a charging location.




RE: "Makes due" is do-do...
By snhoj on 5/15/2014 6:44:45 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I'd love to see these all-electric drive-trains assisted by a low-weight, high efficiency generator -- something that would double the range, better if there were meals, visits or other mid-trip stops. Besides the extended range, the generator would give the owner a Plan-B if they found themselves at the road-side with a discharged battery pack: they could do a partial recharge while parked, then creep towards a charging location.


A tiny turbine alternator would be nice. They can be lubrication free with air foil bearings and quite efficient in a very narrow operating band. They are very power dense and so are compact and light and they can be qualified to run on all sorts of different fuels. It would be the perfect companion to an EV converting it to a serial hybrid. If battery tech would allow a say C30 battery then the battery could be very small and light and would basically just load level for the turbine alternator to minimize the number of starts it needed to do. Considering how light and compact the rest of an EV drive train is such a vehicle could wind up substantially lighter than a conventional vehicle. With low weight comes improved performance and efficiency.


terrible
By laststop311 on 5/19/2014 9:07:28 AM , Rating: 2
VW don't throw away your good name on this crap. What I think most americans want to see from you is an electric/diesel car with a true 115 mile electric range not an 115 mile range with everything turned off driving like a 90 yr old grandma that can't see but a true 115 mile range while still being able to drive quite aggressively and if needed the heater and a/c and music lighting and heated/cooled seats and infotainment powered on. Basically we need 115 min range while driving as free as we want than that number goes up if we drive like a grandma and use no climate control.

Now the diesel engine will be strictly an electric generator only if the electric motor runs out of its TRUE 115 miles (not fake rated 115 miles) will the diesel generator kick in. I say diesel because it's a more efficient generator design that can generate more power on less fuel than gasoline. All they would need is a super efficient 4 cylinder maybe even just a highly efficient 3 cylinder diesel generator would be enough to power the electric to the motor if you run out of range.

VW makes awesome diesel cars. Pair a super efficient VW diesel motor to a true 115 mile range car and I think that would cover over 97% of americans driving needs. I personally dont know a single person that commutes over 40 miles to work and I know a lot of people and I live in the midwest. And for the few percentage that do need say 200 miles a day they will still be doing less than half their driving on fuel. And a little super efficient turbo'd 3 cylinder diesel would surely give over 50 mpg on it's own.




RE: terrible
By laststop311 on 5/19/2014 9:18:58 AM , Rating: 2
get 115 miles on pure electric than say with a 3 cylinder turbocharged diesel producing electric extends it 50mpg H/C combined and all you would need is a little 6 gallon tank to get you 415 miles driven per day.


Translation
By btc909 on 5/17/2014 11:14:50 PM , Rating: 2
This will be painfully slow on Freeways.




"Intel is investing heavily (think gazillions of dollars and bazillions of engineering man hours) in resources to create an Intel host controllers spec in order to speed time to market of the USB 3.0 technology." -- Intel blogger Nick Knupffer














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