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AT&T Mobility President and CEO Ralph De la Vega  (Source: sulekha.com)
Too bad the FCC's not on board...

You don't have to be a DailyTech reader or technology buff to have heard about Google and Verizon's proposal to set the framework of net neutrality. The issue has gotten considerable play in the national media, in addition to the tech blogs. (Just in case you have no idea, you can read our overview here, the full two-page proposal here, and a review of the document from the Electronic Frontier Foundation here).

In our coverage of this story, we asked whether other players like AT&T and Microsoft would sit quietly by while Verizon and Google attempt to steer the nation's internet policy. That was answered yesterday morning, when AT&T Mobility President and CEO Ralph De la Vega offered his support for his competitor's proposal, FierceWireless reports.

While speaking at a media and technology conference in Boston, De la Vega told the audience that the Google/Verizon proposal "is good for the industry and indicates that two companies from different industries can come together on a difficult issue."

It's interesting that the two companies were able to forge the document together, given their disagreements on net neutrality in the past

Net neutrality has been a hot topic for years, but has received more pointed attention since a federal court ruled that the Federal Communications Committee could not stop Comcast from throttling traffic.

The FCC has since issued a statement that was dismissive of the Google/Verizon proposal. The regulatory body is in the process of crafting its own net neutrality proposal that it plans to bring before Congress.



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If the FCC can't Money will ..............
By Dr of crap on 8/12/2010 10:13:20 AM , Rating: 2
I hadn't heard about Comcast doing the restrictions before this story, but
If I had Comcast I guess I'd be voting with my money and leaving Comcast as soon as possible.
That is how net neutrality will win out.

Of course if every provider is restricting then we have a problem!




RE: If the FCC can't Money will ..............
By Reclaimer77 on 8/12/2010 10:38:40 AM , Rating: 1
90% or more of us have always had de-Facto Net Neutrality from our ISP's. Only Comcast shapes traffic, and even then, I suspect it only effects the worst of the bit torrent and file sharing users in huge urban markets where there isn't enough bandwidth at peak hours.

Virtually everyone in this country has, and has always had, Net Neutrality. Our packets compete openly to get to their destination that same as everyone else's. This issue is really just an excuse for the Federal Government to do what's it's doing best: consolidating more power. Claiming this is a major issue is dubious at best. ONE ISP in the whole country shaped traffic, and got tons of bad press over it. That's not a phenomenon people.


By smackababy on 8/12/2010 11:39:45 AM , Rating: 2
The real problem is, if that ONE ISP got away with it, it sets the standard for the rest to follow.

And the issue to changing ISPs is not as easy as everyone likes to say. In most of the country, I would be willing to best this is true, it is have that ISP or go without.


RE: If the FCC can't Money will ..............
By prenox on 8/12/2010 12:26:23 PM , Rating: 2
Comcast is not the only ISP throttling or shaping traffic they are just the one that got caught.


RE: If the FCC can't Money will ..............
By Reclaimer77 on 8/12/10, Rating: 0
By prenox on 8/12/2010 3:01:30 PM , Rating: 2
Time Warner does it (most likely all cable providers). I know they do when my connection goes from being maxed out down to half of the bandwidth I am supposed to have. The ISP's are putting themselves in this tough situation they are not upgrading their network yet they continue to offer faster speeds with unlimited data. While I agree that the FCC should not be involved the ISP's are making this issue where they have to be involved.


RE: If the FCC can't Money will ..............
By HrilL on 8/12/2010 12:38:09 PM , Rating: 2
Comcast is not the only one doing this. They were just the major one that got caught in the headlights.


RE: If the FCC can't Money will ..............
By Reclaimer77 on 8/12/2010 12:54:38 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Comcast is not the only one doing this. They were just the major one that got caught in the headlights.


I'm tired of this straw man. Either list "all the others" doing it, or be silent. WHO ELSE IS DOING IT!? I honestly want to know. Do you know? Or did it just sound 'cool' when you wrote it?


RE: If the FCC can't Money will ..............
By OUits on 8/12/2010 1:10:01 PM , Rating: 2
Also, I'm afraid a lot of University networks are shaping traffic or have plans to.

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2010/08/ne...


RE: If the FCC can't Money will ..............
By Reclaimer77 on 8/12/2010 2:28:43 PM , Rating: 2
Afraid of what? I don't think Colleges should be expected to continue to allow their students to use their connections as massive file sharing hubs. Which let's be honest, we KNOW is happening on a daily basis. You don't have a "right" to use a Colleges free network any way you see fit.

Plus it's not like Colleges have any choice. They accept government money, so they have to go along with the DMCA, RIAA, and whatever the RIAA has agreed to.

Again, I'm a self confessed pirate. But even I can see how very few people using the Internet legitimately would feel the need to cry for Net Neutrality. It seems to me the movement is nothing more than people doing what I'm doing who want to just keep on doing it, regardless.


By OUits on 8/12/2010 2:54:17 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Afraid of what? I don't think Colleges should be expected to continue to allow their students to use their connections as massive file sharing hubs. Which let's be honest, we KNOW is happening on a daily basis. You don't have a "right" to use a Colleges free network any way you see fit.

Well, I'm not afraid of anything, I guess that's just a term I used. I don't disagree with anything you've said above, but my point was that traffic is being discriminated against in the wild, something you were crying for proof of. Remember that rant?


RE: If the FCC can't Money will ..............
By smackababy on 8/12/2010 3:01:35 PM , Rating: 2
What are you going on about? Sure piracy is a large "problem", but file sharing on a college network is pretty legit. If you restrict that P2P traffic, you cripple a ton of legitimate information sharing. I know I did this in college, and I'm sure a lot of others did as well. What about the research done at colleges? Should they be restricted from sharing those results with each other because someone might be downloading a movie?


By Reclaimer77 on 8/12/2010 3:05:41 PM , Rating: 2
You're preaching to the choir, but I'm just telling you how it is. Not how we want it to be.

quote:
but file sharing on a college network is pretty legit.


LOL well, maybe in YOUR college.


By HrilL on 8/17/2010 12:26:51 PM , Rating: 2
Cox cable actively shapes packets they even claim they do give higher priority to different types of service. Too bad they think Valve game traffic should be lower priority than http and someone with their youtube but that is the case. My latency has gotten worse since they implemented this and it is a lot more jumpy too. Must have some retards at the network management office. I mean gaming and VoIP are way more important than someones youtube.


So let me get this straight...
By d3872 on 8/12/2010 12:46:09 PM , Rating: 3
Google and Verizon come up with a plan that imposes net neutrality on wired connections, but specifically exempts wireless connections.

The president of AT&T's wireless division looks at the plan and declares "this strikes me as a very fair and equitable proposal".

I'm shocked, shocked I tell you...




RE: So let me get this straight...
By OUits on 8/12/2010 1:11:48 PM , Rating: 2
Haha, no doubt. It's funny that Google does an about-face on this issue once they have their position more or less figured out in the wireless space.


RE: So let me get this straight...
By HotFoot on 8/12/2010 2:01:18 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah, actually one of the places I'm more concerned about net-neutrality is wireless. I'm annoyed with wireless providers wanting to sell you an unlimited 3G data plan, and then want to charge you special fees on top of that if you plan to use that data for things like tethering, VoIP, etc. In my opinion, paying once for a product or service is enough.

My current provider doesn't charge fees. However, the trend I've seen over the last decade or so is that when one carrier does it, the others follow suit. Competition in the marketplace, to me, seems a total sham. Kind of like when Bell and Rogers decided to change the definition of "evening" to starting at 20:00 instead of 18:00, and noted that in fine print in one of their bills. I had to shake my head at the fact that both companies did the same thing at the same time, and caught a lot of consumers with surprise large bills.


If an AT&T exec is pleased...
By integr8d on 8/13/2010 3:52:29 AM , Rating: 2
...we're in trouble.




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