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Print 13 comment(s) - last by ZorkZork.. on Aug 12 at 4:15 PM

Asus kills Windows RT tablets

ASUSTek Computer announced today that it would no longer produce Windows RT tablets. The reason the company points to for canceling its Windows RT tablet is pretty much a given: weak sales.

"It's not only our opinion, the industry sentiment is also that Windows RT has not been successful," ASUSTek Chief Executive Jerry Shen told The Wall Street Journal.

Shen noted that the company would continue to make Windows 8 devices using only Intel chips. Shen also notes that ASUSTek will take a write-down on its Windows RT tablets in Q2 but declined to say exactly how much it would be.

Shen said back on July 31 that Windows RT "is not very promising." Lenovo has also stepped away from Windows RT tablets and is focusing solely on tablets that run Intel chips. Many cite the lack of Windows RT applications as the main reason the operating system is unable to compete with offerings from Apple and Android-base manufacturers.

Microsoft has also struggled sell its own Surface RT tablet. Microsoft recently slashed the price of the tablet to $349 to help spur sales. 

Source: Wall Street Journal



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It's no different with Surface
By UpSpin on 8/9/2013 10:47:21 AM , Rating: 2
If even the Microsoft Surface RT, with lots of avertising support from MS itself, fails to properly sell, how should devices from manufacturers with less ambitious advertising campaigns (because they already make money with Android tablets and would have to compete with Microsoft!) sell better?
And honestly companies like Asus etc. don't have a chance to compete with Surface RT from MS as long as they run a closed source OS with no option for real customization, so no surprise that they quit that market.
So Acer wasn't that wrong from the beginning on.

Also, MS never should have tried to release three different operating systems. Either make WP8 tablet compatible (just as Apple and Google succesfully did) or Windows 8 ARM compatible with full fledged support of at least all of Microsofts Software (full Office with all features and programs, Visual Studio, ...) and hardware, and maybe even, through an emulator support for third party x86 software.




RE: It's no different with Surface
By karimtemple on 8/9/2013 11:18:32 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
And honestly companies like Asus etc. don't have a chance to compete with Surface RT from MS as long as they run a closed source OS with no option for real customization
Nobody actually cares that the OS is closed-source or can't be customized. The problem is the built-in on-purpose barriers to software deployment. Without the openness people are used to from Windows, RT simply becomes a me-too third-to-arrive option with no unique appeal.
quote:
Also, MS never should have tried to release three different operating systems.
Well, to them it's just two. I believe they now view Windows proper as a version of RT that has additional legacy compatibility features. The reason they won't let RT die despite all logic to the contrary is because the RT framework is integral to their long-term strategy. It isn't going anywhere. The only options they'll consider going forward are ones that include RT.

A few of those options are pretty interesting, but I doubt Microsoft is clever and limber enough to pull any of them off.


RE: It's no different with Surface
By Flunk on 8/9/2013 1:36:09 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Nobody actually cares that the OS is closed-source or can't be customized. The problem is the built-in on-purpose barriers to software deployment. Without the openness people are used to from Windows, RT simply becomes a me-too third-to-arrive option with no unique appeal.


Definitely, I honestly believe that is the main reason why no one wants to write apps for Windows RT. The biggest advantage Android has over other similar platforms is that you can install apps from anywhere you like, without any hacking. This is the same reason Windows and DOS were successful. Microsoft seems to have forgotten that.

They also seem to have missed that even with the ability to side-load apps at will there is still a place for a well-designed app store (like Google Play or Microsoft's Store).


RE: It's no different with Surface
By dgingerich on 8/9/2013 1:48:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Also, MS never should have tried to release three different operating systems.


Not much up on your MS history, eh? Back in the NT days, they had Windows NT for MIPS, Alpha, PowerPC, and x86, while they were also running Windows 95.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_NT#Supported_...

Windows RT is just an attempt at platform spreading to ARM, just like they used to do with Alpha, MIPS, and PowerPC. It's a good idea to not keep all their eggs in one basket, so to speak. ARM is quite a good platform. What they need to do is make an installer for other ARM tablets and sell it separately for about $30-50. It will probably pick up after that, in time.

The big problem manufacturers are having is that it is not being picked up as fast as they would like. If given time, it would pick up and take off. With MS, they do come late to the party, and usually arrive with a rather clumsy entrance, but eventually come to dominate due to superior long term development. Hyper-V, IE, Office, and Windows NT are perfect examples. Don't count MS out yet. They haven't reached their stride in this arena yet. Once they do, there will hardly be a single table left without an MS OS, whatever it might be named at that point.


By w8gaming on 8/9/2013 9:00:23 PM , Rating: 2
The reason why MS come late and yet ends up dominant in Windows NT is because it was cheaper. They dominated Office because other vendors failed to create a bug free applications for Windows 3.x during the early Windows days, and the practice of bundling deal on the cheaper platform - PC. IE ends up dominate because it is free and it already come with the OS, while Netscape cannot afford to be free forever. If MS wants to dominate in mobile space, they have to seriously re-look at the prices they are selling compared to Android. Somehow Microsoft seems to have lost their way and no longer dare to consider a cutthroat price wars strategy.


RE: It's no different with Surface
By ZorkZork on 8/12/2013 4:15:03 PM , Rating: 2
In reality there are very few things that Windows RT does better than IOS/Android. There is nothing that Windows RT does that consumers cannot get from Android/IOS. Why would someone aside from Microsoft spend resources building software for a 0.1% platform?

Good-old-Windows on the other hand has a number of things it does very well. And for that reason it will sell. Unfortunately most of those things don't translate very well to the tablet format.

A tablet has much more in common with a smartphone than a PC. And for that reason both Surface and Surface Pro will disappear.


What is the point of RT again?
By flyingpants1 on 8/9/2013 1:06:13 PM , Rating: 2
I think it's time to drop RT and focus on putting out Silvermont convertibles in the sub-$500 market.

Silvermont-based Surface for $499, Haswell i5-based Surface Pro for $699. Both with keyboard.




RE: What is the point of RT again?
By Flunk on 8/9/2013 1:37:56 PM , Rating: 2
They could probably get a Silvermont Surface down to $399 if they tried hard enough but I can't see a Haswell-based Surface Pro for less than $799.


By Solandri on 8/9/2013 1:58:07 PM , Rating: 2
The point of RT was to scare Intel into making sure Silvermont was a significant improvement over their stagnant Bonnell-era Atom line. By developing Windows RT for ARM, Microsoft told Intel "get your butt in gear or we can drop you from the x86/x64 Windows gravy train you've been feeding from."

Incidentally, rumors are the ODM that Microsoft hired to make the Surface is Pegatron, which is the old (now spun-off) manufacturing branch of Asus (who also use Pegatron almost exclusively).
http://microsoft-news.com/digitimes-microsoft-surf...


Wrong Business Model!
By aspartame on 8/9/2013 3:02:00 PM , Rating: 2
Microsoft's main failure is the wrong business model. It would be nice to port .Net apps to RT and integrate to current systems, but M$ prohibited that. As a result both Intel and M$ are switching from consumer to enterprise platform with expensive hardware, cpu and operating system. In the very near future most consumer devices, including desktops, will be based on ARM cpus and free operating systems.




RE: Wrong Business Model!
By w8gaming on 8/9/2013 9:03:43 PM , Rating: 2
The future is not really possible yet until ARM get a lot better in processing power. Even home market will need more than what current ARM can offer. The vendors do not really believe that either, or we would have seen a ARM based platform with 2 terabyte hard drive to store all the photos, music, videos that everyone is hoarding. :)


Fire Sale time?
By PitViper007 on 8/9/2013 11:19:47 AM , Rating: 1
Does this mean they're going to have a fire sale of their remaining Windows RT Tablets? If it does and its cost is low enough, I might just have to bite.




RE: Fire Sale time?
By Flunk on 8/9/2013 1:39:05 PM , Rating: 2
ASUS has been fire-saleing their Windows RT tablets for a while now. They may even be out of stock at this point.


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