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Print 14 comment(s) - last by NICOXIS.. on Jan 5 at 12:50 PM

Graphics maker hopes to gain more ground over NVIDIA

AMD followed up its earlier announcement of long awaited netbook Fusion CPUs with the official launch of its Radeon HD 6000 mobility series of GPUs.  AMD, who recently seized the discrete GPU sales crown from NVIDIA, hopes to advance in this market long dominated by its competitor, almost a year after its first release of DirectX 11 mobile GPUs

The Radeon HD 6000M series targets several tiers.  The 64xx M models will target the mid-range, the 65xx-66xx M will target the higher mid-range, and the 68xx-69xx M will find their way into expensive gaming/enthusiast laptops.

Much like many other players in the graphics and entertainment industry, AMD is touting the wonders of 3D technology, which it is offering in a mobile package for the first time.  AMD's HD3D will work with those goofy stereo television glasses.  AMD will be publishing APIs for use by advertisers, game designers, and whoever else wants to jump on the 3D bandwagon.

For those less interested in 3D, they may still be happy to know that AMD employs and exclusive acceleration technology for the popular DivX video, which NVIDIA does not provide.

AMD's second generation DirectX 11 mobile GPUs also provide architectural refinements over the previous 5000 M series and support EyeFinity, AMD's technology that can drive up to six separate displays, all from a laptop.


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Stats of new GPUs
By DanNeely on 1/4/2011 2:32:29 PM , Rating: 5
6900M: 960SP, 580-680 mhz, GDDR5
6800M: 800SP, 575-675 mhz, GDDR5
6700M: 480SP, 500-720 mhz, GDDR5 or DDR3
6600M: 480SP, 500-720 mhz, GDDR5 or DDR3
6500M: 400SP, 500-650 mhz, GDDR5 or DDR3
6400M: 160SP, 480-800 mhz, GDDR5 or DDR3
6300M: 80SP, 500-750 mhz, DDR3

All models use the VLIW5 architecture of the 2xxx-68xx series cards, not the new VLIW4 architecture of the 69xx cards.

I'm not sure what the difference between the 6700M and 6600M is. Both are listed on the same page, and nothing is called out as being different from one to the other.

The number of GPUs available with either DDR3 or GDDR5 and the wide range of clock speeds allowed is going to create confusion in the market, but is nothing new compared to prior generations from them and nVidia.




RE: Stats of new GPUs
By Hard Ball on 1/4/2011 2:50:19 PM , Rating: 3
Some of these have only minimal changes from the previous Mobility Radeons, like the 6300, 6500, and 6800 lines.

The others are respectively the Mobility versions of Caicos, Turks, and Barts; so they roughly correspond to the desktop versions of these.


RE: Stats of new GPUs
By DanNeely on 1/4/2011 3:28:28 PM , Rating: 2
Maybe. Are the 6800/6500 native 800/400SP parts, or 960/480SP parts with part of the chip disabled? The same could be asked of the 6300, but disabling half the chip seems rather unlikely; the other two are no larger than other historic binning activities.

Have actual specs for Turks of Caicos been leaked yet, or are you just assuming that the mobility parts are rough equivalents of the desktop ones? I think it's a likely assumption, but haven't seen anything about the lower end 6xxx desktop parts yet.


RE: Stats of new GPUs
By dakkon5 on 1/4/2011 3:57:52 PM , Rating: 3
6800M = Mobility HD5800
6500M = Mobility HD5600 (and HD5730)

You can tell by UVD version - newer chips, based od Barts/Turks/Caicos have UVD3 support, while older HD5xxx chips support only UVD2.


RE: Stats of new GPUs
By DanNeely on 1/5/2011 10:19:23 AM , Rating: 2
Thanks. I feel a bit embarrassed for not thinking to check stuff like that since I did something similar to figure out which shader architecture they were using.

If AMD isn't offering any cut down chip versions all they must be getting really good yields from TSMC.


RE: Stats of new GPUs
By darckhart on 1/4/2011 4:25:21 PM , Rating: 5
I move we delete that article and replace with it with DanNeely's comment.


RE: Stats of new GPUs
By vortmax2 on 1/5/2011 9:21:16 AM , Rating: 3
Second that...


RE: Stats of new GPUs
By NICOXIS on 1/5/2011 12:50:50 PM , Rating: 2
triple that......


Seems you're an uninformed
By Lolimaster on 1/4/2011 11:35:23 PM , Rating: 2
AMD is introducing Dinamic SG wich offer switchable graphics.

http://www.donanimhaber.com/ekran-karti/haberleri/...

Were is nvidia know? In pure power efficiency AMD owns them(people know that, a reason why they marketshare in mobile grow A LOT), now with the same switchable techonology.




RE: Seems you're an uninformed
By DanNeely on 1/5/2011 10:23:49 AM , Rating: 2
FYI (since Google translate doesn't correctly autodetect it), the linked page is in Turkish.


Curious
By Drag0nFire on 1/4/2011 2:45:35 PM , Rating: 2
Curious that they're not touting their power efficiency in the press release. I think more than premium graphics features (3D, eyefinity), a solution like NVidia Optimus will be increasingly important for viability in the mobile market. Particularly when integrated graphics are finally a viable option for most (non-gaming) content, a laptop needs to be able to leverage the resulting power savings.




RE: Curious
By DanNeely on 1/4/11, Rating: -1
The day I will switch...
By greylica on 1/5/11, Rating: -1
RE: The day I will switch...
By JPForums on 1/5/2011 9:50:45 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
When AMD releases a decent driver or then a free one that is just usefull for Linux

I can only assume you mean open source as I've never had to pay for an ATI driver in my life.
As far as open source drivers go, both ATi and nVidia have stable 2D accelleration and a lack of stable 3D acceleration in linux.
http://nouveau.freedesktop.org/wiki/
http://dri.freedesktop.org/wiki/ATIRadeon

As I recall, ATi was the first to support open source development of their drivers. They didn't open source their code for reasons that may or may not match their public statement, but they did dump a lot of documentation on the open source community. I haven't kept up with it in a while, but I don't know that nVidia has even done that yet.
quote:
Nvidia, ... , are at least letting users write their own drivers for Ge Force cards without lot's of idiot pressure

I'm not sure what you mean by "idiot pressure". Clearly similar progress is being made on ATi and nVidia opensource drivers despite "idiot pressure". That said, it does seem that the ATi opensource drivers are a little slow to support newer GPUs. Perhaps this could be the effect of "idiot pressure". Of course, given that I've only tried the opensource driver on one Fermi based GPU (which was ironically unstable), the nVidia opensource drivers may have the same sluggishness.

As far as proprietary drivers go, nVidia definitely has a driver that is more refined and easier to install. That said, my recent history with proprietary drivers shows that Ati has improved and that nVidia is not without fault.

GTX460 - 3D Rendering issues and random lockups in Unbuntu 10.04 when using any OpenGL application. Tried multiple drivers without resolution. Even had lockups with the open source driver outside of OpenGL applications. Works fine under Windows 7 (verified by Furmark and over a month of error-less folding)

HD4850/HD4870 - Slightly more involved to get up and running under CentOS 5.5, but haven't had an issue yet. Pretty straight forward under Ubuntu 9.04. Open source driver is good enough that I forgot I hadn't installed the proprietary driver until I tried to fire up an OpenGL app.

GTX260(216sp)/GTX275 - Easy install and no issues under any of Ubuntu 10.04, RHEL 5.2, and FreeBSD 8.1. Haven't really tried the open source driver on these cards.


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