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The 2011 Sonata Hybrid has a face only a mother could love, but not many can argue with its fuel economy ratings of 37 mpg (city), 40 mpg (highway)
New Sonata Hybrid undercuts similar offerings from Toyota, Ford

Back in late March, Hyundai announced two additional variants of its popular Sonata midsize sedan: the Hybrid and a more powerful 2.0t (turbocharged) model. While the Sonata 2.0t has already hit dealer lots, the Hybrid will soon be making its way to consumers.

Ahead of the official public launch, Hyundai has announced pricing for the Sonata Hybrid. The base price of the vehicle will be a relatively low $26,545 including destination fee. This compares favorably against the Toyota Camry Hybrid ($27,335) and the Ford Fusion Hybrid ($28,990).

The Sonata Hybrid is capable of achieving 35 mpg in the city and 40 mpg on the highway (37 mpg combined). For comparison, the aforementioned Camry Hybrid and Ford Fusion Hybrid are capable of 31/35 and 41/36 respectively.

“Sonata Hybrid offers something new to the mid-size sedan segment, with its segment-leading 40-mpg highway fuel economy rating, differentiated appearance, and incredible value,” said John Krafcik, Hyundai Motor America president and CEO. “Like the 2.4L direct-injected Sonata and the 2.0L Sonata Turbo launched earlier this year, Sonata Hybrid demonstrates Hyundai’s unique approach melding innovative technologies and emotional design into products more and more people want to put in their driveways.”

The Sonata Hybrid uses a 2.4-liter direct-injection gasoline engine that has been modified to run on the Atkinson Cycle along with a standard six-speed automatic transmission instead of a CVT that is traditionally used with hybrids. In addition, the Sonata Hybrid uses a lighter lithium-polymer battery pack instead of the NiMH batteries used in the Camry Hybrid and Fusion Hybrid.

While the base Sonata Hybrid undercuts the competition, a higher-spec "Premium" model will also be available for $31,545. This trim level adds 17" wheels, panoramic sunroof, navigation system, rear backup camera, and leather seating.

The Sonata Hybrid along with the recently introduced 2011 Elantra are some of the first baby steps that Hyundai is taking to reach a fleet-wide goal of 50 mpg by 2025.



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Really?
By eek2121 on 12/17/2010 2:14:02 AM , Rating: 2
Seems like we still struggle to match the prius's benchark gas performance. Why can't anyone match toyota in the MPG wars? Are they really that far ahead? Hell, my 09 civic gets 40 mpg on the highway if i don't speed. Let me know when vehicles can actually break 50 MPG highway while not compromising on size or horsepower.




RE: Really?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 12/17/2010 2:52:00 AM , Rating: 5
Well, it's a conventional vehicle made to be a hybrid instead of a dedicated hybrid like the Prius, so of course it can't match a Prius in mpg. But it does stomp all over the Camry Hybrid which is its direct competitor.

Also, your Civic is a compact. The Sonata/Camry/Fusion are midsize.


RE: Really?
By Lord 666 on 12/17/2010 7:27:46 AM , Rating: 1
Eek just doesn't get it. One example that meets his criteria is the Volt. Yet, eek would say its [too expensive/small/new/unproven/made by gm/insert bs excuse here] and rather drive the status quo 09 compact Civic. This Sonata and the upcoming Passat will be game changers.

While not that extreme, just converted someone in my family from a Sante Fe to TDI wagon. They went from two fill ups per week to three tanks in two weeks. A 1st grader can figure out the break even/ROI on that one.

Hynduai is a smart company and willing to take some risks. That's unlike Honda who have lost their mojo and refuse to use their technology (diesel specifically) because it will be too "expensive."


RE: Really?
By coolkev99 on 12/17/2010 8:52:25 AM , Rating: 3
Well.. in reality it almost always comes down to the money. Auto makers are in business to SELL cars. Most people can't afford a $40,000 car, and those that can probably aren't too worried about the oosts at fill-up.


RE: Really?
By Spuke on 12/17/2010 3:28:30 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Most people can't afford a $40,000 car, and those that can probably aren't too worried about the oosts at fill-up.
$40k spent on a car =! filthy rich. They care too and most cars in that price range get pretty good gas mileage. With the exception of the Sonata, the gas mileage in this class and the $40k class is the same.

BTW, I think the consumers in the $40k range are the same one's in this cars class. I know plenty of people, myself included, that can afford a $40k car but won't buy one new. Maybe a used one.


RE: Really?
By Cypherdude1 on 12/22/2010 1:09:34 AM , Rating: 2
35/40 MPG for $26,545 to $31,545? Hardly worth it. Look at the Volkswagen diesel specs here:
http://www.vw.com/en/models/jetta/features_and_spe...

You'll see that TDI Clean Diesel gets 30/42 MPG and the cost is $23,000 to $24,100. Of course, it is a diesel so you'll have to gas up around trucks when necessary. I haven't actually looked around to see how easy it is to find diesel.

As I mentioned before, I think Volkswagen is on the right track. Diesels are far simpler than hybrids. Hybrids have both a gasoline engine and an electric motor. Hybrids are more expensive to maintain. Plus, the battery pack must be replaced which is very expensive.

I've rented a number of models for long trips. The best mileage I ever got was from a VW Jetta. Unfortunately, the Jetta I rented, about 5 years ago, was a bit cramped.


RE: Really?
By FITCamaro on 12/17/2010 10:25:14 AM , Rating: 3
Hyundai is a company that copies the good styling of other companies 2-3 years after they debut it. They lack originality in anything.


RE: Really?
By Spuke on 12/17/2010 3:11:03 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Hyundai is a company that copies the good styling of other companies 2-3 years after they debut it.
So what car from 2-3 years ago did they copy with the Sonata?


RE: Really?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 12/17/2010 3:41:04 PM , Rating: 2
I would have agreed with you two or three years ago, but Hyundai is pretty much forging its own design language now.

Azera http://i55.tinypic.com/293g47b.jpg
Sonata http://i54.tinypic.com/9jmaer.jpg
Elantra http://i54.tinypic.com/2lc5mp4.jpg
Accent http://i51.tinypic.com/2v10k5t.jpg
Tuscon http://i53.tinypic.com/2vcbwcg.jpg

They all have brand identity and are pretty much "all Hyundai". Now the Genesis/Genesis Coupe are a bit derivative IMHO.


RE: Really?
By sprockkets on 12/18/2010 6:46:17 PM , Rating: 2
They took some styling cues from the old Toyota Solara with the current Sonata.

Not to mention their buddies at Kia took the Civic design and ran that theme across the line.


RE: Really?
By Samus on 12/17/2010 4:41:53 PM , Rating: 2
Right, it's a conventional vehicle modified into a hybrid, like the Ford Fusion.

However, the Fusion gets better fuel economy and doesn't even have direct injection...so typical sub-par Korean engineering. But they are catching up, and the price is astonishing considering the level of technology in this car.


RE: Really?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 12/17/2010 5:33:40 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
However, the Fusion gets better fuel economy and doesn't even have direct injection...so typical sub-par Korean engineering.


Not really -- they get about the same mileage. The Ford is better in the city, and the Hyundai is better on the highway -- there numbers are almost exactly reversed. Their combined ratings are near identical.

Fusion Hybrid: 41 city/35 highway
Sonata Hybrid: 35 city/40 highway

So I'm not so sure I understand your "sub-par Korean engineering" statement. And the reason why the 2.4-liter engine has direct injection is because the same engine (without the Atkinson cycle) is used in the standard Sonata which produces 198hp (24 city/35 highway).

The Ford's standard 2.5-liter produces 175hp (23 city/33 highway).

On top of that, the Sonata Turbo's 2.0-liter inline-4 engine produces 274hp (22 city/33 highway) versus the Fusion V6's 263 hp (18 city, 27 highway). It also produces more torque across the entire rev band.

So again, your statements don't make much sense...


RE: Really?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 12/17/2010 6:15:36 PM , Rating: 2
Edit, that should be 36 mpg highway for the Fusion Hybrid.


RE: Really?
By Samus on 12/18/2010 3:14:02 PM , Rating: 3
We will see how reliable Hyundai's direct injection and turbocharged engines are in the long run...Hyundai and Kia have an iffy history when it comes to introducing new engine technology...crankwalk problems when they went to dual overhead cams in the 90's, chronic premature timing belt failures on their variable valves engines in the past decade. I won't even begin with their manual gearboxes...

The best engines ever offered in Hyundai and Kia vehicles were made by Mitsubishi and Mazda, respectively.


RE: Really?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 12/19/2010 7:13:19 AM , Rating: 2
So when you get called out on false statements, you fall back to the " they must be unreliable" stance. Riiiight.

I doubt they'd offer a 10 year powertrain if they built engines that grenaded. It just doesnt make good business sense.


RE: Really?
By Nik00117 on 12/18/2010 9:03:22 AM , Rating: 2
Ford Fiesta 41 MPG $13,000...


RE: Really?
By phantom505 on 12/18/2010 11:52:12 AM , Rating: 3
I spent $17k on my 2011 Fiesta with more or less all the options there weren't leather or sun roof. Dual clutch auto, SYNC, seat warmers, styling package.

I average 37-38 MPG combined city/highway. It goes drop off if I go into Boston, but even then were talking 33 MPG combined.

Sure it's smaller than this car, but it was also $8k cheaper. If you just need wheels and don't want to drive a POS, Fiesta is a descent choice. It only runs me $520/yr to insure with $100 deductible in Maine, with 1 minor accident. So overall, pretty reasonable on cost to own.


RE: Really?
By Masospaghetti on 12/19/2010 2:42:38 PM , Rating: 2
Your Civic is rated at 34 or 36 mpg highway, depending on the transmission. I don't care what YOU get on the highway, and I don't think anyone else does either. I've gotten 30 mpg in a Ford Explorer, but that's just as meaningless as there's no basis for comparison.

And, more importantly..your Civic is rated at 29 MPG, combined cycle. The Sonata Hybrid is 37 MPG combined, the Fusion Hybrid 39 MPG combined. A big difference for a bigger, heavier vehicle.


RE: Really?
By Fost04mach on 12/21/2010 10:01:41 AM , Rating: 3
My old 02 tdi jetta had no problem doing 50mpg hwy. And 700+ mile range was easily achieved even with city driving mixed in (I averaged 47). That was years ago though, before diesel emissions killed fuel economy...


Nice 'stache!
By cparka23 on 12/17/2010 1:06:01 AM , Rating: 3
It's not bad-looking, overall, but it's the proverbial chick with a hairy upper lip. I just can't stop staring at that ugly piece of trim over the grill.




RE: Nice 'stache!
By spread on 12/17/2010 1:46:48 AM , Rating: 2
It's kind of ugly but in a refined and beautiful way.

Kind of like a movie that's so bad, it's actually good.


RE: Nice 'stache!
By Gungel on 12/17/2010 7:02:29 AM , Rating: 2
It looks like the car is melting. Maybe the batteries got to hot.


RE: Nice 'stache!
By Anoxanmore on 12/17/2010 10:12:27 AM , Rating: 2
That is a pretty car... I want.


RE: Nice 'stache!
By FITCamaro on 12/17/2010 10:22:43 AM , Rating: 2
It looks like they tried to match the lower bumper of a Mazda with an insanely blown up version of the Chrysler logo.

It's like a butter face. Nice from the rear but then you go around front and vomit.


RE: Nice 'stache!
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 12/17/2010 11:09:46 AM , Rating: 3
Agreed. It's all kinds of FAIL.


RE: Nice 'stache!
By Hiawa23 on 12/17/2010 3:28:22 PM , Rating: 2
I may not fully understand the whole hybrid vs gasoline engine thing but 37MPG seems low to me. Am I unrealistic in thinking that hybrids at minimum should get 50MPGs?


RE: Nice 'stache!
By Solandri on 12/17/2010 6:03:57 PM , Rating: 4
Fuel consumption is the inverse of MPG, so the difference between 37 MPG and 50 MPG isn't as big as the MPG figures make it seem. Because it's the inverse, most of your fuel savings happens from getting away from the extreme low-MPG range.

12 MPG = 8.33 gal per 100 miles
16 MPG = 6.25 gal per 100 miles
20 MPG = 5 gal per 100 miles
25 MPG = 4 gal per 100 miles
30 MPG = 3.33 gal per 100 miles
37 MPG = 2.7 gal per 100 miles
40 MPG = 2.5 gal per 100 miles
50 MPG = 2 gal per 100 miles

So if you drove the vehicle 15k miles per year, 37 MPG would use 405 gallons, while 50 MPG would use 300 gallons. A difference of about $300/yr at today's gas prices.

Put another way, going from 20 MPG -> 30 MPG saves you 1.67 gal per 100 miles. Going from 30 MPG -> 50 MPG saves you just 1.33 gal per 100 miles. Even though the first is a 10 MPG improvement while the second is a 20 MPG improvement, the first actually saves you more gas.

The rest of the world measures fuel efficiency in liters per 100 km (like gallons per 100 miles) for this reason. The EPA is attempting to correct this with the new labels for electric vehicles. It lists power consumption in kW-hr per 100 miles.


RE: Nice 'stache!
By Targon on 12/18/2010 6:58:57 AM , Rating: 2
Basic math, going from 20 to 30 miles per gallon is a 50 percent improvement, while going from 30 to 40 miles per gallon is only a 33.3 percent improvement.

Going from 30mpg to 45mpg would give you that same 50 percent improvement as going from 20 to 30mpg would.

In general, you want to make sure that you get a good value for your money. Spending $40,000 for a vehicle that only saves you $500/year in gas compared to a $25,000 car that is equal in terms of quality, features, and size is no bargain.


2010 Prius is also a mid-sized sedan...
By mmcdonalataocdotgov on 12/17/2010 8:21:44 AM , Rating: 2
Why does every car manufacturer try to take mid-sized sedan fuel mileage honors, when the Prius is a mid-size in 2010, and it gets 50 mpg combined? (Okay, this is not a beauty contest, cause none of them look good - so don't go there.) So in fact the Prius is the class leader. Ford is still talking about the Fusion being the class leader, and now Hyundai is trying to take it.

I know from experience that Toyota spends no money on advertising. It had voice commands, nav, auto everything etc more than a few years back, and before Ford came out with Sync, and they never said a word about it. They are not talking about the Prius either.




By EJ257 on 12/17/2010 8:43:04 AM , Rating: 3
You make a good point. Unless your driving a gazillion miles a year it probably don't make sense to put down that much extra cash for the hybrid model. If you want to save money by getting better mpg slow down and don't accelerate at every green light like your trying to set a new land speed record.


By Flunk on 12/17/2010 9:44:36 AM , Rating: 2
Although it's classed as a mid-size the Prius is significantly smaller than the Sonata Hybrid in every exterior dimension and interior passenger space. It's not really comparable, especially with the price difference.


RE: 2010 Prius is also a mid-sized sedan...
By T2k on 12/17/2010 10:22:22 AM , Rating: 2
Are you fuckin' serious? Prius as midsize sedan?
If you are coming from a long line of midgets, married to other - hopefully non-related - midget and have two midget kids then I can grudgingly agree that a Prius might be a midsize sedan for you.
But in any other case Prius is an utter piece of shit small compact car, with shitty interiors, ugly exteriors and useless for more than two adults (6'3" and up already excluded.)


RE: 2010 Prius is also a mid-sized sedan...
By goku on 12/18/2010 4:54:31 PM , Rating: 2
6'3" and up already excluded? What? What are you babbling about? I'm 6'3 and I had the opportunity to drive an '09 Prius and there was PLENTY of leg room AND headroom. 39.5" of headroom rivals that of SUVs and is significantly more than the 37" of headroom in the Camry or other such vehicles. I could push the front seat all the way back, sit in the back seat and still have leg room. While the legroom is about 2" less than in a Camry, the car is definitely a midsize car. For a tall person such as myself, I found the Prius actually to fit me significantly better than the Camry with its smallish 37" of headroom, causing me to rub my head against the headliner, just like any other car save for the '96-'00 Honda Civic Sedans.


By Keeir on 12/19/2010 11:52:26 PM , Rating: 2
Sigh. Always this arguement.

The Prius is a "midsize" car because the EPA uses Total Interior Volume which includes car area. Since the Prius is a Hatchback, it gets to count all the area under the rear window.

The Toyota Prius has ~52.8 Cubic Feet in the Front Seat, 41.8 cubic feet in the Rear Seat and 21.6 cubic feet of Cargo Space. This Hyundai Sonata has 60.9 cubic feet in the Front Seat, and 42.8 cubic feet in the Rear Seat with a Cargo Capacity of 16.4.

The EPA would rate the Prius as a Compact, if the Prius had a typical trunk size of 14-15 cubic feet.


By Keeir on 12/19/2010 11:52:27 PM , Rating: 2
Sigh. Always this arguement.

The Prius is a "midsize" car because the EPA uses Total Interior Volume which includes car area. Since the Prius is a Hatchback, it gets to count all the area under the rear window.

The Toyota Prius has ~52.8 Cubic Feet in the Front Seat, 41.8 cubic feet in the Rear Seat and 21.6 cubic feet of Cargo Space. This Hyundai Sonata has 60.9 cubic feet in the Front Seat, and 42.8 cubic feet in the Rear Seat with a Cargo Capacity of 16.4.

The EPA would rate the Prius as a Compact, if the Prius had a typical trunk size of 14-15 cubic feet.


By Fost04mach on 12/21/2010 10:05:53 AM , Rating: 2
Maybe if you consider the nissan joke an suv...


Why?
By Shadowmaster625 on 12/17/2010 8:10:37 AM , Rating: 1
I had a 2008 sonata non-hybrid for a weekend and it got 36 mpg. What is the point in paying thousands extra for a 10% gasoline savings???? If you drive 20,000 miles a year and you save 10% we are still only talking about 2000 miles a year. At 40mpg that is only 50 gallons. 57 gallons at 35mpg. Best case is you save 57 gallons a year; so even at $3.51 a gallon that gives you a max savings of only $200 a year . That is crazy!! If you only drove 12000 miles a year and gas was only $3 then you'd only be saving $100 a year. What kind of lame brain moron could possibly justify paying anything more than $1000 for a hybrid option??? Given the time value of money and finance charges, a hybrid option is only worth about $500 .




RE: Why?
By coolkev99 on 12/17/2010 9:24:05 AM , Rating: 3
:sigh: What your car got on the highway last weekend, or on your drive to Grandmas house last month has little to do with the EPA fuel consumption estimate. The best it does is offer some sort of way to compare cars when shopping.

Does the EPA for the 2008 Sonata state 36mpg? NO.

Then why are you comparing it to the EPA estimate of the new hybrid? Never ever ever ever compare your "real world" results to an EPA estimate. Apples and Oranges.


RE: Why?
By Spuke on 12/17/2010 4:11:04 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I had a 2008 sonata non-hybrid for a weekend and it got 36 mpg. What is the point in paying thousands extra for a 10% gasoline savings????
So you don't think you would be able to get that same increase in mpg if you were driving a hybrid Sonata?


RE: Why?
By goku on 12/18/2010 4:59:33 PM , Rating: 2
Since it's a hybrid, he might actually get even greater savings. I found that in driving various gasoline vehicles, I get about 15% better fuel economy than its EPA rating. However when I rented an '09 Prius, instead of getting 52.9mpg (46mpg+6.9) I ended up averaging 70mpg. Now that's definitely not going to happen with the OP but having a hybrid definitely opens doors to much improved fuel economy, assuming you know how to take advantage of it of course..


They consider that to be good fuel economy?!?
By Targon on 12/17/10, Rating: 0
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 12/17/2010 7:29:45 AM , Rating: 2
Again, the Ford Focus is a compact car. The Sonata is a midsize sedan, bordering on a fullsize sedan with a much larger trunk and much more passenger space on top of that.

You can't compare a Focus to a Camry, Sonata, Fusion, etc. if you want to get an accurate representation of what to expect for fuel economy.


By T2k on 12/17/2010 10:25:40 AM , Rating: 2
Exactly. For some reason we either have a surprisingly high number of midgets registered here or surprisingly high number of shockingly stupid kids who, regardless of being utterly clueless, love to post ignorant comments ie comparing apples to oranges.


RE: They consider that to be good fuel economy?!?
By gvaley on 12/17/2010 7:34:01 AM , Rating: 2
Why do people continue comparing the incomparable? The Focus is a much smaller car. Smaller cars are lighter by a good margin, have lower drag coefficient and smaller frontal area, usually use narrower tires and can be driven by smaller-displacement engines.

Understand that the same drivetrain, put in two different-sized cars, will always produce higher MPG in the smaller car. Can you be sure that the Sonata drivetrain, if fitted in a Focus, won't produce better results than the original drivetrain? And even if it can't beat the original it will probably produce higher performance.

In theory, if Hyundai hasn't messed up something big time (unlikely), their hybrid drivetrain should be the most efficient on the market because of the ~20% lighter Li-Pol batteries that they innovatively decided to use in their cars. Especially compared to NiMH models.


By marvdmartian on 12/17/2010 8:12:05 AM , Rating: 1
Because they lack imagination? Or common sense??

"But hey, my moped gets better mileage than that! Never mind the fact that it only seats 1 (comfortably), and has next to no cargo carrying capability!!" (eye roll)


What we need in these stories is more information
By Targon on 12/17/2010 7:31:04 AM , Rating: 1
I wish the numbers in fuel economy articles would specify highway mpg, or combined city/highway mpg for the numbers. Some stories list a target mpg number without saying if it is combined city/highway or just highway, and that makes for a big question how far away the industry is from hitting the government target numbers.

We are seeing quite a few cars in the compact and subcompact "class" that are hitting close 40mpg(that is US gallons, not imperial) highway right now without being a hybrid. If the requirements are for getting a certain level in highway mpg, that is VERY different from the combined city/highway numbers.

It is also virtually impossible for a company that sells both cars AND trucks/SUVs to expect to hit 45mpg highway since the averages will be dragged down. Getting a truck or SUV to even 30mpg highway will take a bit.




By Brandon Hill (blog) on 12/17/2010 7:33:18 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I wish the numbers in fuel economy articles would specify highway mpg, or combined city/highway mpg for the numbers. Some stories list a target mpg number without saying if it is combined city/highway or just highway, and that makes for a big question how far away the industry is from hitting the government target numbers.


Ummm...
quote:
The Sonata Hybrid is capable of achieving 35 mpg in the city and 40 mpg on the highway (37 mpg combined).


RE: What we need in these stories is more information
By Targon on 12/17/2010 7:49:45 AM , Rating: 2
I am talking more about in general. The government EPA requirements for 2025 for example does not specify in articles if it is combined or not. You still can't expect Ford to hit 37mpg combined average across all product lines if they are still selling trucks/SUVs.


By Spuke on 12/17/2010 4:09:26 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
You still can't expect Ford to hit 37mpg combined average across all product lines if they are still selling trucks/SUVs.
CAFE uses a different formula for figuring mpg. You can't go by the EPA sticker.


Hybrid Gas savings dont match cost
By cknobman on 12/17/2010 10:09:09 AM , Rating: 1
and until it does I wont buy in.

Real world number for me:
Drive ~20000/year
Ford Edge gas mileage ~20/mpg (had for 3 years now so I have an accurate baseline to judge)
1 year gallons of gas: 1000
~Cost of gas: 2.75(In texas this is about average)
~Yearly cost: 2750

Lets say I get a hybrid like the Fusion or the Sonata
Drive ~20000/year
~gas mileage ~36/mpg (merely estimated and not observed so it could be less or more)
1 year gallons of gas: 1000
~Cost of gas: 2.75(In texas this is about average)
~Yearly cost: 1527

So cost for 1 year:
Edge: 2750
Hybrid: 1527
Savings: 1222

Only 1222 worth of savings and that is comparing a mid sized hybrid sedan to a freakin crossover SUV!!!! The savings would be considerably worse against a comparable non hybrid mid sized sedan!!!!




By cknobman on 12/17/2010 10:11:06 AM , Rating: 1
Oops cant edit but let me fix my copy/paste typo:

Lets say I get a hybrid like the Fusion or the Sonata
Drive ~20000/year
~gas mileage ~36/mpg (merely estimated and not observed so it could be less or more)
1 year gallons of gas: 555.5
~Cost of gas: 2.75(In texas this is about average)
~Yearly cost: 1527


By FITCamaro on 12/17/2010 10:27:34 AM , Rating: 2
The government: Oh yes you will.


RE: Hybrid Gas savings dont match cost
By bah12 on 12/17/2010 12:45:59 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
The savings would be considerably worse against a comparable non hybrid mid sized sedan!!!!
Just for fun and a true apples to apples.

Ford Fusion (best non hybrid) 26MPG combined.
Fusion Hybird 39 MPG combined.

@$3/gallon and 20K per year.
Fusion | Gallons 769.23 | Cost $2,307.69
Hybrid | Gallons 512.82 | Cost $1,538.46
Savings $769.23/year or $64.10/month

So yah not worth it. Especially since this all assumes that there is absolutely 0% chance of an out of warranty repair to the hybrid drive. Essentially ANY repairs not covered would rapidly eat into any savings. Granted most are covered for 60K+ if not more, but still considering the 5+ years you'd have to own the car to make up the initial cost difference it is a risk nonetheless and for very little reward.


Please, please, please....
By GWD5318 on 12/17/2010 10:22:24 AM , Rating: 3
don't make me ride in the angry catfish! It's angry!




Would be good for LA
By Zo0noUno on 12/17/2010 1:13:07 AM , Rating: 2
I'm not really digging the more unique design of the sonta hybrid vs the sonata, but i don't really dislike it. Either way, i'd rather buy the Ford I think because it looks nicer, despite the fact that it may have a worse combined mileage than the sonata if you drive on the hwy most of the time (which i do).




Better looking
By BernardP on 12/17/2010 10:10:17 AM , Rating: 2
The main advantage of the Sonata Hybrid is that the front end looks better than the regular version. That hexagonal opening is an improvement over the generic "smiling mouth" grille found on so many cars today.

And it would look even better if the upper chrome mustache was removed.




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