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Artist rendering of a planet orbiting dwarf star
Astronomers have discovered 37 new objects this year

The world's leading team of planet-hunting astronomers announced the discovery of 28 new exoplanets, increasing the number of known exoplanets to 236.  University of California, Berkeley researchers announced the discovery, with the findings coming from research conducted by California and Carnegie Planet Search and the Anglo-Australian Planet Search teams.  The discovery was revealed during the annual American Astronomers Society meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii.

"We added 12 percent to the total in the last year, and we're very proud of that," said Jason Wright, University of California, Berkeley post-doctoral fellow.

The Earth's solar system is far from unique, and it is possible there could be billions of habitable planets -- many of which have obviously not been identified.  

Researchers were especially excited about a planet which orbits a star much like Earth's sun, and is located only 30 light-years away.  While most of the exoplanets discovered were originally detected by the wobble their gravity causes, the one around Gliese 436 crosses directly in front of its star when viewed from Earth.      

Astronomers from around the world have discovered as many as 37 new objects in the past year.  Each new object orbits a star, but is smaller than it.  As many as seven of the objects are brown dwarfs, meaning they are stars larger than Jupiter-sized planets -- two others are borderline, meaning they can be small brown dwarfs or larger gas giants.

Researchers keep track of discovered exoplanets on the California and Carnegie Planet Search team web site, which can be found by clicking here.


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Hmm?
By therealnickdanger on 5/30/2007 10:59:54 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
The Earth's solar system is far from unique, and it is possible there could be billions of habitable planets -- many of which have obviously not been identified.

I'm not sure this statement can be qualified as anything other than speculative. So far, we have not found a solar system anything like our own, especially one that supports life. Our system is completely unique until proven otherwise. There is no science to back your claim.




RE: Hmm?
By Martimus on 5/30/2007 12:11:41 PM , Rating: 2
Did you actually read the quote that you are supposedly arguing against? It says that there could be billions of habitable planets.

It is unlikely that there are many that we could live on, because of our delicate pH balance and Atmosphere needs, as well as the small temperature range in which we can survive, along so many other reasons, but there is no reason that some sort of life cannot live on another planet. Life itself is only something that practices self preservation and reproduces. If any planet has anything that can do those two things, then it is habitable for that lifeform at least.


RE: Hmm?
By sld on 5/30/2007 1:46:38 PM , Rating: 2
But how did life arise on those planets?

Simple molecules to non-racemic mistures of proteins and sugars?

Proteins all left-handed, sugars all right-handed? Count in cytosine hydrolysis (to uracil) and Gibbs free energy of the synthesis of DNA?

And if we're going to refer to the Grey-Miller experiment, they were scientists who created special conditions in the lab. To wit, they were the ' creators ' of the organic molecules found in the brown soup that formed after all that electrical discharges. :)


RE: Hmm?
By fake01 on 5/30/2007 5:03:41 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It is unlikely that there are many that we could live on, because of our delicate pH balance and Atmosphere needs, as well as the small temperature range in which we can survive, along so many other reasons, but there is no reason that some sort of life cannot live on another planet. Life itself is only something that practices self preservation and reproduces. If any planet has anything that can do those two things, then it is habitable for that lifeform at least.


It has been proven, that on this very planet "Earth" that bacteria can live under the most extreme conditions. Whether it be under super heated water/gas near a volcano where no human life (without some sort of high protection) can live. Whether it be 5 miles under the ocean surface where the pressure will be to great for humans to withstand, but bacteria, and some living species (crabs etc) can live perfectly fine. Whether it be in a toxic or poisonous gas where humans cannot breathe, or under radioactive decay. So I'm pretty sure that if theres an exoplanet that has to many of these features for us to no be able to live on normally, another form of life can live there without no problems.

So saying that no living things will ever be found living on these planets without proof is just completely stupid, go and read a bible or run outside and raise your hands in the sky and reach for GOD. Come to think of it, the chances of these planets having some sort of living bacteria on it will be far greater than anyone proving the existence of GOD, let alone finding him/her/it.


RE: Hmm?
By AlexSpy on 5/30/2007 12:15:09 PM , Rating: 2
Isn't that being very closed minded? I mean, give the universe a chance!


RE: Hmm?
By XesBOX on 5/30/2007 3:34:39 PM , Rating: 2
It saddens me that the most interesting articles are mostly visited by trolls like Montrevux and those who would scoff at the idea that life can be sustained in an environment different than Earths.

"The universe is limitless. There exists no boundaries. Some where.. at some point.. at some time.. if you can imagine it, it exists. Even that which you haven't imagined yet; still exists."

The last year has seen an *over whelming* amount of satellite discoveries and I for one pity people who don't feel some kind of excitement about it.

<geekout>
HOLY CRAP ITS A SILITHID DESTROYER! ARM THE PROTON CANNONS!
PEW!PEW!PEW!PEW! *makes crashing sounds*
EVASIVE MANEUVERS!
HAHAHAHAHAHA DIE SCUM DIE! HUMANS RULE DELTA QUADRANT!@ /flex
</geekout>


RE: Hmm?
By thatguy39 on 5/31/2007 4:15:25 AM , Rating: 2
You... are a fool.


Hahahah!!! I mis-read
By Souka on 5/30/2007 1:08:19 AM , Rating: 2
Hehehehe... I mis-read the article title..

I thought it said "28 New Exploits Discovered" As I clicked I was thinking... oh here we go again, MS making the news with more >exploits< ...

Too funny, I'm sure I wasn't the only one!




RE: Hahahah!!! I mis-read
By tkSteveFOX on 5/30/2007 3:17:10 AM , Rating: 2
My faith lies with Europa.I`m shure that there`s life beneath that thick ice.I was overwhelmed by the landing on Titan.We don`t have the time nor the funds to do such outer solar system searches.Infact we should have been to Europa a decade ago.


By drank12quartsstrohsbeer on 5/30/2007 12:31:40 PM , Rating: 2
[Insert French Joke here]


Yet...
By Montrevux on 5/30/07, Rating: -1
RE: Yet...
By Oxygenthief on 5/30/2007 12:50:16 AM , Rating: 5
"Space, the final frontier. These are the voyages of Daily Tech. To discredit the hard work of astronomers who are trying to search out new life and new civilizations. To boldly state the obvious like everyone else before... him."

*Sigh* I miss Star Trek.


RE: Yet...
By KaiserCSS on 5/30/07, Rating: 0
RE: Yet...
By jacarte8 on 5/30/2007 8:52:44 AM , Rating: 3
Excatly. And where do you think all the dolphins came from?

So long and thanks for all the fish


RE: Yet...
By MatthewAC on 5/30/2007 1:29:11 AM , Rating: 3
Yet more planets that we will never reach in this lifetime..

Of course, we could make it.
Go tell a person who lived from 1880 to 1970 and see if they'd believe they'd land on the moon ;).


RE: Yet...
By mezman on 5/30/2007 3:35:29 PM , Rating: 2
If someone was alive in 1970, I'm willing to bet they'd believe that humans had been to the moon. :) Unless they were a complete loon who thinks the landings were faked that is.


RE: Yet...
By fake01 on 5/30/07, Rating: 0
RE: Yet...
By Samus on 5/30/2007 1:41:45 AM , Rating: 2
Yea dude, seriously, we still can't even prove is Mars does or doesn't have life. We're still finding evidence of water there, and if there is water and heat, there is likely living bacteria.


RE: Yet...
By ZoZo on 5/30/2007 2:54:58 AM , Rating: 2
There is no "heat" there, it's very cold, the whole planet is in water-freezing temperatures (< 0 degrees Celcius).


RE: Yet...
By jajig on 5/30/2007 3:06:39 AM , Rating: 2
Mars has heat, even space has heat as it is above absolute zero.


RE: Yet...
By Rabbagast on 5/30/2007 5:04:28 AM , Rating: 2
It's actually up to 26 degrees celsius in the daytime around equator


RE: Yet...
By kingpotnoodle on 5/30/2007 7:47:43 AM , Rating: 2
Been there have you?

Verified that have you?

World leading scientist or omniscient deity are you?


RE: Yet...
By aguilpa1 on 5/30/2007 9:05:05 AM , Rating: 1
chill Yoda...., (do or do not, there is no try)....hmmm


RE: Yet...
By dice1111 on 5/30/2007 9:13:37 AM , Rating: 2
How embarassing...


RE: Yet...
By drank12quartsstrohsbeer on 5/30/2007 10:37:22 AM , Rating: 2
"Not one of them will have life. "

Youll have to find a girlfriend on this planet. Sorry.


RE: Yet...
By sld on 5/30/2007 1:50:26 PM , Rating: 2
I agree. I love astronomy as it brings wonderful sights of God's creations from deep space right to everybody, but it is a tad wasteful to channel so much funding into the search for extraterrestrial life when they will never find it.

That includes the watt-hours spent on SETI@home. Do the favour to Folding@home instead, gentlemen.


RE: Yet...
By wordsworm on 5/31/2007 8:47:31 AM , Rating: 2
If only we spent a fraction of the money wasted on religious warfare and churches on space exploration, we'd have found alien life by now.


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